Felted Mitten – keep your hands COOL

Felted Oven Mitt

This pattern features an unusual 2 piece construction, knitting separate fronts and backs. I don’t see why it couldn’t be used to make cold weather mittens as well as oven mitts.


  • 100% wool worsted weight yarn: 150 yards ecru (MC); 50 yards red (CC)
  • size 11 straight knitting needles
  • stitch markers (M)


11 stitches and 18 rows = 4 inches in stockinette (St) with yarn doubled


Yarn is doubled throughout. Abbreviation M1: Make 1 increase by making a backward loop on right hand needle.


With MC, cast on 19 sts. Work 16 rows St stitch.

Row 17: *K to last 2 sts, K1, M1, K1

Row 18: Purl

Rows 19-30: Rpt rows 17 & 18 (27 sts).

Row 31: K 19, BO 1, K7.


Working on 8 thumb stitches only, work even in St stitch for 3 rows.

Row 4: K1, ssk, K2, K2tog, K2.

Row 5: Purl

Row 6: K1, ssk, K2tog, K2.

BO last 4 sts.


With RS facing, attach yarn and work on remaining 19 stitches.

Row 1: purl.

Row 2: K2, place M, beg Chart, place M, K1, M1.

Rows 3-25: Work in St st, following Chart.

Rows 26-28: Remove markers,work in MC.

Row 29: K1, ssk, k to last 3 sts, K2tog, K1.

Row 30: purl.

Rows 31-34: Rpt rows 29 and 30.BO remaining 13 sts.

Make second piece, reversing pattern and omitting chart.


With RS together, sew pieces of mitt together and weave in ends.

Optional: Blanket stitch around edges with CC, placing sts 1/2 inch apart and 1/2 inch deep.

Felt using your favorite method.

You can easily knit some matching potholders using chart and sizing as desired.


Broken Garter Scarf

Ohhh. I’m in trouble…. Purl Soho keeps posting beautiful free patterns made with their exquisite yarns. Broken Garter Scarf is the latest, posted just today. Just got through ordering the yarn to knit one up for my beautiful daughter, who truly appreciates my work (not everyone loves hand knits, I’m afraid. )


This is lovely in the shell pink, but not a good shade for Erica. She chose a beautiful pale blue, which, oh happy day, is on sale!

You can access this pattern right over here.

Cushy Cable Hat

The loosely formed cables on this little hat are eye catching, aren’t they? That’s what first caught my eye, anyway, and when I checked out the free pattern, it became even more interesting because it’s made from roving, Paton’s Classic Wool Roving in Cherry. The pattern calls for size 9.5 and 10.5  (US) double points, and two skeins of yarn, which comes in 16 yummy colors. Looks like fun!


free pattern

My Favorite Felted Mittens Pattern

photo: LGP

This past winter, I knitted, felted and sold about 20 pairs of felted mittens at pre-holiday craft fairs. I don’t mind making socks on circular needles, but not mittens – guess the hole for the thumb bothers me, I dunno. Anyway, I use the 2-needle pattern below, but I make the mittens much larger than if they weren’t about to be felted. That means, for a child, I make a small adult size. For men, the bigger medium or largest  size. You have to use your judgement and know your yarn. Use your judgment for women.  For felting, I’ve found that Paton’s 100% wool worsted weight gives me predictable results. It is readily available, inexpensive, knits up beautifully, and comes in many lovely solids and blends. Yarns made specifically for felting shrink too much for this application.

Traditional two needle mittens work up quickly, and suit everyone from child to adult. Use up your yarn stash and knit a pair of mittens in a different color for everyone in the family.
Sizes: small child, medium child, large child, adult

# Materials: #5 and #7 needles
# 200 yards of worsted weight yarn
# 1 stitch holder
# 2 stitch markers
# tapestry needle

Gauge: 5 sts = 1″ on #7 needles

Cuff: With smaller needles, loosely cast on 24(28-32-36)sts. Work *K1, P1,* ribbing until piece measures 2 1/2 (3 1/2, 4, 4 1/2)”. Change to larger needle.

Hand: Row 1 (right side): K2, inc in next st, K to last 3 sts inc in next st, K1. Row 2 Purl. Continue working in SS until piece measures 1″ (1 1/4, 1 1/2, 2″) from end of ribbing, ending with a P row. For the last 3 sizes only Work 2 more rows. (SS)

Thumb Gusset: Row 1: K12 (12-14-16-18), place marker on needle; inc in each of next 2 sts, place marker on needle: K12 (14-16-18) sts. Row 2: and all even rows Purl. Row 3: K to marker, sl marker, inc in next st; K to st before next marker, inc in next st, sl marker, K to end. Repeat Rows2 and 3 until there are 8 (10-12-14) sts between the markers; end by working Row 2.

Divide for Thumb: K12 (14-16-18), drop marker; K8 (10-12-14)sts for thumb, and then place thumb sts on holder; K 12 (14-16-18) Work even in SS until work measures 4″ (5 1/2 -6-7″) from start of Hand, ending by working a purl row.

Top Shaping: Row 1: *K2, K2tog; rep from* across. Row 2: Purl. Row 3: *K1, K2tog, rep from * Row 4: Purl. Row 5: K2tog across; break yarn, leaving 18″ end. Thread yarn into tapestry

needle, run needle through remaining sts. Slip sts off needle, pull yarn up tightly and fasten securely. leave yarn for sewing.

Thumb: Sl sts from holder to needle, purl one row. Work even in SS until thumb measures 1 1/4 ( 1 3/4-2-2 1/4″) ending with a purl row. Next Row: K2 tog, rep across row cut yarn leaving 12″ end finished the same as above. Fold mitten and sew seams.

Your mittens will be comically large and floppy. That’s OK, that’s what you want. Follow your best felting instructions until they shrink to size. I’ve been known to throw wet mittens in the dryer, medium setting, to get to where I want them.

Good luck, happy knitting , let me know how you do!

(updated 2/2/11)

Textile History: The Oldest Trousers in the World







Yes, pants. The earliest known pair anywhere. Business Insider just posted an article about an archaeological find in Western China, the graves of two nomadic horsemen that are about 3,000 years old. The researchers, from the German Archaeological Institute, say that this discovery supports the theory that trousers were initially designed for riders to provide them with the protection and freedom of movement that tunics, gowns, and loincloths simply cannot. They speculate that the men in the graves were herders and warriors, judging from the goods buried with them, such as a wooden bit and a bow.

“Each pair of trousers was sewn together from three pieces of brown-colored wool cloth, one piece for each leg and an insert for the crotch. The tailoring involved no cutting: Pant sections were shaped on a loom in the final size. Finished pants included side slits, strings for fastening at the waist and woven designs on the legs.” The team calls them “a ground-breaking achievement in the history of cloth making.”
Read more: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/first-pants-worn-horse-riders-3000-years-ago#ixzz33RgheVT5


Knitting Tips: Clothes Moths – Arrrgggh

Every fiber arts forum I read has questions, at least once a week, about clothes moths. We all get them every once in a while, so I thought I’d gather some info on the little buggers all together in one place.

There are two varieties, the case clothes moth, and the webbing clothes moth.

It is not the larger moths that fly around light that you have to worry about. Clothes moths look like this, but are smaller and slimmer than the enlargement shown here, usually less than 1/2 inch long. Otherwise, they look just like this one. When they are able to fly around, they pose no danger to your woolens YET. But don’t ignore them. It’s their eggs, larvae, and larva cases that you have to beware of.

This is the case moth’s larval case. If you find even one of these, you can figure that there will very soon be more. Believe it or not, these cases are made of silk! The larva carries it around as it moves. Its head emerges to eat, but retracts when finished or if it feels threatened.

These are the eggs and larvae of the webbing moth. Yuk.

How to get rid of them? There are many products on the internet that are safe and environmentally friendly, and they are easy to find. It takes work, though, to eliminate moths, as well as persistence. Some people say that placing infested material in a freezer for a few days kills them, but I’m not sure if that would take care of eggs or larvae.

How to prevent them?

Both adults and larva prefer low light conditions, so try to store your fiber items in a bright place. Keep them in tightly closed containers; I know from experience that zip lock plastic bags will not keep moths out; they simply chew right through. Moth traps are available and are recommended by some sources. Herbal sachets smell good and may work at first, but as the herbs dry out, its effectiveness quickly wanes. I’ve had good luck placing an unwrapped bar of Irish Spring soap in each container. Keeping the floors clean, preferably with a vacuum, also helps. Check often for adult moths and larva cases, and take action at the first sign that they’ve returned.