52 Dishcloth Patterns

imageFor some time now, Knit Picks has been posting a free pattern a week for dishcloths. I generally knit the same simple pattern over and over for mine, because after a few uses, a dishcloth tends to look, well, like a used dishcloth. But some of these are pretty enough to give as gifts. I like to use a nice one to gift wrap small items like soaps or shower gel. This site contains both knit and crochet designs.

So, without the proverbial further ado,

here’s the link

to all these great little free patterns. (Wait, isn’t ” great little” an oxymoron?”)

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Pivot Cowl

img_0985Some knitters find garter stitch to be tedious, and avoid it whenever possible. But as this cowl shows, garter doesn’t have to be boring. In fact, it lends itself quite nicely to shaping, in a neat, tailored sort of way that stockinette or fancier stitches can’t quite match. This design combines short row triangles with rectangles, and one of the things that appealed to me when it caught my eye on the Purl Soho site this afternoon is the way it drapes without bunching up around the neck the way many cowls do. I also like the stitch definition that the yarn, Cashmere Merino Bloom, produces. Having now knitted several garments from Purl Soho kits, I can testify to the excellent quality of their yarns. Pivot is made on size 5 US straight or circular needles.

As soon as I finish the Purl Soho Drachenfels shawl that currently occupies my needles, the Pivot Cowl may just be my next project.

Knitted Poppy

Memorial Day 2016 come and gone , but this little poppy pattern would be perfect for next year, or  for Veterans’ Day, which is coming  up fast.   Most knitted or crocheted flowers tend to be fluffy or floppy, but Lion Brand’s poppy is smooth and simple. Nice by itself  for a pretty, summery pin, or for embellishing bags, hats, sweaters, or just to wear on special days to show gratitude to generations of vets.

The pattern is free, but you must be a member to access it. Free and easy to sign up.

Pattern

 

Felted Mitten – keep your hands COOL

Felted Oven Mitt

This pattern features an unusual 2 piece construction, knitting separate fronts and backs. I don’t see why it couldn’t be used to make cold weather mittens as well as oven mitts.

Materials:

  • 100% wool worsted weight yarn: 150 yards ecru (MC); 50 yards red (CC)
  • size 11 straight knitting needles
  • stitch markers (M)

Gauge:

11 stitches and 18 rows = 4 inches in stockinette (St) with yarn doubled

Notes:

Yarn is doubled throughout. Abbreviation M1: Make 1 increase by making a backward loop on right hand needle.

Pattern:

With MC, cast on 19 sts. Work 16 rows St stitch.

Row 17: *K to last 2 sts, K1, M1, K1

Row 18: Purl

Rows 19-30: Rpt rows 17 & 18 (27 sts).

Row 31: K 19, BO 1, K7.

Thumb:

Working on 8 thumb stitches only, work even in St stitch for 3 rows.

Row 4: K1, ssk, K2, K2tog, K2.

Row 5: Purl

Row 6: K1, ssk, K2tog, K2.

BO last 4 sts.

Hand:

With RS facing, attach yarn and work on remaining 19 stitches.

Row 1: purl.

Row 2: K2, place M, beg Chart, place M, K1, M1.

Rows 3-25: Work in St st, following Chart.

Rows 26-28: Remove markers,work in MC.

Row 29: K1, ssk, k to last 3 sts, K2tog, K1.

Row 30: purl.

Rows 31-34: Rpt rows 29 and 30.BO remaining 13 sts.

Make second piece, reversing pattern and omitting chart.

Finishing:

With RS together, sew pieces of mitt together and weave in ends.

Optional: Blanket stitch around edges with CC, placing sts 1/2 inch apart and 1/2 inch deep.

Felt using your favorite method.

You can easily knit some matching potholders using chart and sizing as desired.

Speckled Scarf

 

speckled-scarf-600-17

This morning while surfing over at  Purl Soho, which  is quickly becoming my fave knitting website, this simple but classic scarf caught my eye. It’s made with fingering weight linen yarn, and resembles woven fabric rather than knitted, I think. Equally suitable for women and men. Recommended needle size is U.S. 3.  The slip stitch pattern should go fairly quickly despite the fine yarn.

Funny, I just realized that with knitting as well as reading, I choose projects or books according to my current mood. It has to feel right, or I can’t drum up any enthusiasm. Lately, I’ve been going for wraps and scarves, even though I certainly don’t need more of those! What I most enjoy about knitting is watching the patterns and colors develop as I work. What kind of knitter are you?

Knitting Tips: Sizing Socks for Adults and Children

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These charts can be used to determine the length of knitted/crocheted socks for particular sizes. You might want to increase the foot length by 1/2 inch or so to accommodate shrinking, growth, or snugness.

Men’s Sizes

Shoe size / Foot length

Women’s Sizes

Shoe Size / Foot length

US
6
6.5
7
7.5
8
8.5
9
9.5
10
10.5
11
11.5
12
13
14
15
16
Inches
9.25″
9.5″
9.7″
9.75″
9.9″
10.1″
10.25″
10.4″
10.6″
10.75″
10.9″
11.”
11.25″
11.6″
11/9″
12.2″
12.5″

US
4
4.5
5
5.5
6
6.5
7
7.5
8
8.5
9
9.5
10
10.5
11
11.5
12
Inches
8.2″
8.4″
8.5″
8.75″
8.8″
9.0″
9.25″
9.4″
9.5″
9.7″
9.8″
10″
10.2″
10.3″
10.5″
10.7″
10.9″

Kid’s Sizes

Shoe size ——————— Foot length

0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5
3.25″
3.5″
3.6″
3.75″
4″
4.1″
4.25″
4.5″
4.6″
4.75″
Approximate Age Infant
(0 – 12 months)
5.5
6
6.5
7
7.5
8
8.5
9
9.5
10
10.5
11
11.5
12
5″
5.1″
5.25″
5.5″
5.6″
5.75″
6″
6.1″
6.25″
6.5″
6.6″
6.75″
7″
7.1″
Children
(1 – 5 years)

12.5
13
13.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5
5.5
6
6.5
7
7.25″
7.5″
7.6″
7.75″
8″
8.1″
8.25″
8.5″
8.6″
8.75″
9″
9.1″
9.25″
9.5″
9.6″
9.75″
Youth
(6 – 10 years)