Kitchener Stitch Cheat Sheet

For at least  five years, the Tricksy Knitter website has had this great, easy to follow Kitchener Stitch instruction sheet, which I’ve followed for each of the many pairs of socks I’ve knitted. Figuring that it’s probably safe enough to  repost it by now ithout the link going dead, I’ve decided to share it here for all my intrepid sock knitting readers. How long have you wished for one of THESE ?! Thank you, thank you, Tricksy Knitter !!

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Gridded Pullover

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Browsing new knitting patterns is one of my favorite online pastimes, so quite frequently I’ll save promising patterns that I find to a folder on my home screen, and yesterday, while searching for something else, the Gridded Pullover from Lion Brand popped up. I haven’t made it yet or even looked at it for a while, but this pattern looks well suited to the recommended yarn, Lion’s worsted weight cotton, 24/7, and I like its  loose yet not baggy drape effect of its lines. This yarn is available in 24 colors, but for some reason, I’m always attracted to the icy blue shade in which this sweater is knitted. It’s made in four pieces on size 6 (US) needles, and looks as though it would work up fairly quickly. Also, the instructions look pretty clear.  At the moment, I’ve got the second of a pair of socks, and another pullover on the needles, but this might just be my next project. It’s looking to be a long winter this year….

Find the free pattern right over here.

Harvest Afghan

C284FCDB-4DD2-410A-848E-FF7CF45A23E1The blend of textures and colors in this cozy afghan make it a perfect fall or winter project, its variations offering much more interest than one that is uniform throughout. And, once it games no some size, it’ll keep you cozy while working. The yarns are from Bernat and a size 8(US) 36 inch circular needle is suggested.  The pattern is accessible free of charge from Yarnspirations.

 

 

 

Click here for pattern

Dressing the 18th Century Woman

IMG_1028Visiting history museums is one of my favorite activities, especially places like Plymouth Plantation, Old Sturbridge Village, or Williamsburg, where great care is spent getting things right. But something I find really irksome is seeing interpreters playing “dress up”, wearing clothing that sort of evokes the period they are portraying but is far from authentic. Pants with zipper flies, for instance, or sneakers, or push up bras.  You also see this kind of thing in parades. If something’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right. So it was with great interest that I viewed the following video, produced by National Museums Liverpool.

The video can be accessed here

 

 

 

Shakespeare Knits: Act I

William Shakespeare was one writer who was familiar with the fiber arts, and he referenced them often in his work. Thinking about “the ravll’d sleeve” made me curious enough to look up more references. Here are the first few:

Antony and Cleopatra

II 2:

To hold you in perpetual amity,
To make you brothers, and to knit your hearts
With an unslipping knot, take Antony
Octavia to his wife
; whose beauty claims
No worse a husband than the best of men.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

I, i:

HERMIA. My good Lysander!

I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,

By his best arrow, with the golden head,

By the simplicity of Venus’ doves,

By that which knitteth souls and prospers loves,

And by that fire which burn’d the Carthage Queen,

II, 2:

O, take the sense, sweet, of my innocence!
Love takes the meaning in love’s conference.
I mean, that my heart unto yours is knit
So that but one heart we can make of it;

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IV, i:

THESEUS Fair lovers, you are fortunately met:
Of this discourse we more will hear anon.
Egeus, I will overbear your will;
For in the temple by and by with us
These couples shall eternally be knit:
And, for the morning now is something worn,
Our purposed hunting shall be set aside.

V, 1 :

Thisbe
O wall, full often hast thou heard my moans,
For parting my fair Pyramus and me!
My cherry lips have often kiss’d thy stones,
Thy stones with lime and hair knit up in thee.

The Tempest

III, 3:

My high charms work
And these mine enemies are all knit up
In their distractions; they now are in my power
;

Macbeth

II, 2

Methought I heard a voice cry ‘Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep’, the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleeve of care,
The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course

How many people realize that sleave, as the word was spelled in Shakespeare’s work, means, not part of a shirt, but a knot or twist of silk fiber?