Shakespeare Knits: A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Note the distaff behind Thisbe and the spindle in front.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Act I, scene i:

HERMIA. My good Lysander!

I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,

By his best arrow, with the golden head,

By the simplicity of Venus’ doves,

By that which knitteth souls and prospers loves,

And by that fire which burn’d the Carthage Queen,

Act II, scene 2:

O, take the sense, sweet, of my innocence!
Love takes the meaning in love’s conference.
I mean, that my heart unto yours is knit
So that but one heart we can make of it;

Act IV, scene i:

THESEUS

Fair lovers, you are fortunately met:
Of this discourse we more will hear anon.
Egeus, I will overbear your will;
For in the temple by and by with us
These couples shall eternally be knit:
And, for the morning now is something worn,
Our purposed hunting shall be set aside.

Act V, scene 1 :

Thisbe
O wall, full often hast thou heard my moans,
For parting my fair Pyramus and me!
My cherry lips have often kiss’d thy stones,
Thy stones with lime and hair knit up in thee.

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About katknit

Took early retirement (yay!) and now have more time to pursue my favorite things.
This entry was posted in fiber arts, knitting, spinning and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Shakespeare Knits: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

  1. Pingback: A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream « Mixed Media

  2. Pingback: A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream « Meet Cute

  3. knitterarian says:

    I LOVE your textile history and folklore posts. Thanks!

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