One Cable Hand Warmers


imageToday I discovered my next ” muffatees” project. At the Connecticut  Works festival this afternoon, which was held on the beautiful grounds of the Avery-Copp house museum in Groton,  I sold a pair of cabled arm warmers that were cabled from fingers to elbow. They were very pretty, but felt too bulky for my own use and I never wore them or made any others. When I arrived home,  I found that a very similar design for shorter mitts had  magically appeared in my email,  from the Blue Sky Alpacas newsletter.

The pattern is free, but you do have to create a free account to access the download, which you can get here . The beautiful worsted hand dyed yarn shown is named “Petunia”, and should work up quickly on the recommended size 9 (US) needles.

Fall Knits: Katia Poncho


imageI don’t generally go in for ponchos, so was surprised when this pattern caught my eye. I love the cables, drapy-ness, and color, and it looks like the back and front can be sewn part way up to make a sort of loose pullover. Onto the TBK list it goes!

The recommended yarn is Katia Merino Baby, which is sport weight and comes in truly lovely colors. Oh, I see that the beautiful mulberry shade is out of stock on the web site. Will either have to wait or find it somewhere else.  The cost is $6.50 a ball. Size medium requires 9 to 10 balls. Needle size 6 (US). The pattern can be downloaded here .

Fall Knits: Apple and Pumpkin Hats for Kids


First day of Autumn’s coming, time for more cute baby hats. These patterns are all over the web, but I couldn’t resist posting mine. Also including a shot of the asters in our CT garden, abuzz with bees this warm, sunny afternoon. There’s said to be a sharp decline in honey bee numbers this summer, but we sure have plenty of bumble bees!

The Bumble Bee is the common name for any of a group of large, hairy, usually black-and- yellow, social bees. They are found primarily in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, often ranging farther north and higher in altitude than other bees. Fifty species of bumble bees are known in North America alone! Bumble bees are similar to their close relatives, the honey bees, in that their colonies are headed by a queen, who is the main egg-layer, and many workers, who are the daughters of the queen, and in that drones (males) are produced during the mating

season. However, the colonies of bumble bees, unlike those of honey bees, only survive during the warm season; new queens hibernate alone to begin another colony the following spring. In addition, there are usually fewer individuals in a bumble-bee colony than in a honey-bee colony, and bumble bees do not use a dance to communicate the location of food to other members of the colony, as honey bees do. Also, although bumble bees collect nectar and store it as honey, they do not hoard large amounts of it, as do honey bees. Bumble bees are sensitive to habitat disturbance. In England, several species are thought to have become extinct in past decades due to land clearing and agricultural practices.

Bee info from http://www.insectstings.co.uk/

Patterns:
apple hat

pumpkin hat

adult size

Historic Knitting: Our Boys Need Socks


Red Cross poster circa 1918. Reproduced and available for purchase at The Library of Congress online shop.

As during the War Between the States, knitting played an important role on the home front, providing those left behind with a purpose, and those fighting with a few comforts. The American Red Cross played a vital role in organizing knitting drives across the US.

Below is a link to the socks pattern distributed to volunteer knitters by the Red Cross. This page features a clip of one of the newspapers in which the pattern was originally made available to the public. There are numerous other vintage patterns available on the net.

pattern

52 Dishcloth Patterns


imageFor some time now, Knit Picks has been posting a free pattern a week for dishcloths. I generally knit the same simple pattern over and over for mine, because after a few uses, a dishcloth tends to look, well, like a used dishcloth. But some of these are pretty enough to give as gifts. I like to use a nice one to gift wrap small items like soaps or shower gel. This site contains both knit and crochet designs.

So, without the proverbial further ado, here’s the link to all these great little free patterns. (Wait, isn’t ” great little” an oxymoron?”)

Prismatic Scarf


imageWow, this is pretty! It’s also a first – the first time I’ve found a free pattern that I like on my newsfeed on Facebook. The pattern actually appears on the blog Feather And Fan: here’s the link. Definitely going to knit this, but not till I find just the right yarn. It’s near 90 and muggy today, so I probably won’t be doing that for a while….